7 Reasons to Go to Eucharistic Adoration

Saint Alphonsus Liguori proclaimed, “Of all devotions, that of adoring Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament is the greatest after the sacraments, the one dearest to God and the one most helpful to us.”  Sitting before the Eucharist in awe and wonder is something faithful Catholics have been doing for centuries.

Whether you are a faithful or lapsed Catholic, here are seven reasons why you need to be going to Eucharistic adoration today. Don’t worry you still have time to go now (either before or after reading this post).

Eucharistic adoration

Unites You to the Sacrament of the Eucharist

According to St. Mother Teresa of Calcutta, “When you look at the crucifix, you understand how much Jesus loved you then. When you look at the Sacred Host, you understand how much Jesus loves you now.” Now. The Eucharist is the Sacrament of the Real Presence of Jesus Christ. His body, blood, soul, and divinity under the appearance of a simple host.

Sitting in Eucharistic adoration lets you draw closer to the Mystery of the Eucharist. How easy is it for us to dismiss this reality? But by driving to a local church you are making a sacrifice. A sacrifice of time. The same sacrifice you make on Sunday.

Increase in Holiness by Bathing in the Light of the Son

People enjoy tanning in the sunlight during summer or visit tanning salons. Going to Eucharistic Adoration does for your soul what a tanning salon does for your skin— it transforms it. Too much physical light burns. If you stay before the light of the Son too long your sins will be identified and destroyed.

Eucharistic adoration is a precursor to confession. St. Clare of Assisi proclaimed, “Gaze upon him, consider him, contemplate him, as you desire to imitate him.” Standing in the “Sonlight” will lead to you think like the Son. You will be more patient. Kinder. Gentler. More obedient to your parents, spouse, priests, bishop or other spiritual authorities in your life.

Bath in the light of Son and be prepared for noticeable results.

Removes You from Temptations

Along with leading you notice your sins, frequent attendance of Eucharistic adoration will remove you from tempting situations. Think about it. Simply being before the Blessed Sacrament takes you away from the worldly things. Occasions of sin. My parish’s deacon, who is currently in seminary to become a priest, said there is always a choice between God and the world. Christ or the cell phone.

In the times of greatest temptation seek our Lord! The Good Thief on the Cross gazed loving at Jesus during his greatest temptation. He could have easily fallen prey to despair. Why didn’t he? Because he looked to Jesus to take away his temptations and limitations.

Helps You to Examine Your Conscience

The longer you remain in the presence of God the more you will reflect on your failings—your sins. Remember being in the light of Christ will make your sins more recognizable.

Provides a Reboot to Your Spiritual Life

rest in the Lord

We all need a reset. Our lives get busy. Busy lives lead to tiredness. And tiredness causes us to give into temptation and sin. Think of sin as a virus that corrodes our soul. Without a proper defense the virus (of sin) will attack us more often and successfully cripple us spiritually.

Eucharistic adoration acts as a kind of system reboot to our spiritual lives. Praying in the light of Christ brings us countless graces that will be effective in repairing us and warding off sin.

Take time to rest. Rest in the pew. Sit (or kneel) before the Lord and ask for renewed strength and energy to reach the big spiritual reset— the Mass!

Prepares You for Sunday Mass

Adoration gets you into the right frame of mind for celebrating the Mass. Spend your time reading the upcoming Sunday Mass readings. Investing time into learning about the theme and reading of the Mass is helpful later on especially when you have younger children who can cause distractions on Sunday.

Praying before the Blessed Sacrament in Eucharistic adoration reminds you of the primary focus of the Mass—Jesus. The readings, rituals, and liturgical garments are all a means to point us closer to the Son.  Gazing upon the Blessed Sacrament reminds us of Jesus’ words in John 6:35, “I am the bread of life; he who comes to Me will not hunger, and he who believes in Me will never thirst.

Because the Church Recommends It

A seventh reason to attend Eucharistic adoration is simple. The Catholic Church tells us to go. According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church paragraph 1380,

The Church and the world have great need of Eucharistic adoration. Jesus waits for us in this sacrament of love. Let us be generous with our time in going to meet Him in adoration and contemplation full of faith. And let us be ready to make reparation for the great faults and crimes of the world. May our adoration never cease.

That reference is actually a quote from Saint Pope John Paul II in Dominicae Cenae: Letter to Priest, Holy Thursday, 1980. I am a big fan of John Paul II. He is amazing because of his close connection to God through the sacraments. I trust in the wisdom of the late Polish pope.

The Eucharist is the source and summit of the Catholic faith (CCC 1324). Jesus is truly the Bread of Life. Like the Apostles, Mary Magdalene, the Blessed Virgin Mary, Joseph, and other New Testament figures, we too see Jesus on a consistent basis. No he will not be donning sandals or his mighty epic beard during Eucharistic Adoration, but we will still experience the same love. Try to find at least 15 minutes this week and visit our Lord at a local church. Better yet invite a friend or family member to go with you!

Related Links

The Eucharist as Presence and Sacrament

Eucharistic Adoration-EWTN


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3 Reasons Why Critically Reading John 6 Will Convert Protestants

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From a young age, I always saw the world through a scientific lens. I needed to understand how the world works. When I attended college, that way of thinking applied to research papers and ensuring I had logical and concise arguments to articulate my interpretation of a particular historical event.

When I read the Gospel of John there is a logical flow to his account of the Gospel events. His entire gospel is masterfully written and laden with tons of symbolism. As a cradle Catholic, I heard John 6 [Jesus’ Bread of Life Discourse] preached frequently during the Mass. It took years of analyzing this chapter and critically viewing it before I realized the genius and truth contained in Christ’s message. Inevitability my close reading of John 6 led me to this conclusion– the evangelist truly believed that Jesus was the literal bread of life that gives humanity eternal life! I give three strong pieces of evidence for this case:

Jesus as a Good Teacher

 I think most people would agree with me that Jesus’ followers considered him a good teacher. Jesus could relate to an array of people: rich, poor, fisherman, tax collectors, sinners, and strangers alike. Secondly, Jesus taught using a plethora of means including: sermons, parables, and miracles to name a few. A quality in any good teacher is consistency in content along with the ability to clarify their subject content should disputes arise. In the bread of life discourse in John 6, Jesus presented both his teaching consistently and clearly. Within a span of 24 verses [John 6:35-59] Jesus mentions point blank at least 6 times he is the bread of life. In verse 35, Jesus states, “I am the bread of life; he who comes to me shall not hunger, and he who believes in me shall never thirst.” Verses 38, 48, 53-58 also support the Nazarene’s intrepid claim.

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It’s all Greek to Me

There are a variety of Greek words for the English verb “to eat”. Jesus says in John 6:54, “he who eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life and I will raise him on the last day.” The Greek word that the Evangelist uses in this verse is trōgō. Trōgō  translates as “chew” or “gnaw”. Why would John use such a fleshy and literal word for eat in this context? This translation only makes sense if we accept that Jesus literally meant that he is the bread of life. John even goes on to use trōgō in verses 56, 57, and 58– a grand total of four times!

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Loss of Followers

The evangelist writes in John 6:66 that many people who followed Jesus from the start of his ministry left him never to return. They were scandalized by the teaching of Jesus as the bread of life. I thought long and hard on this point. Why would many of Jesus’ followers leave him if he only spoke symbolically that he was the bread of life?

Well, if Jesus truly did intend for his claim that he is the “bread of life” to be interpreted figuratively, I doubt many followers would have left him that day. I mean think about it! People tend to become disenchanted with a leader when his or her message becomes too scandalous to bear. I doubt a man speaking figuratively, and poetically, would gather such scandal. Jesus repeatedly claimed “I am the bread of life”. He never qualified that assertion to be taken figuratively. Such difficult news may have been too much for these fair weather followers to swallow.

Most Holy Eucharist

According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, “The Eucharist is “the source and summit of the Christian life” (CCC 1324). It is a non-negotiable belief. Inspired by the Holy Spirit, Saint John knew of the importance of this sacrament and he stressed it frequently in Jesus’ Bread of Life Discourse. Through my Catholic faith, I accept Jesus’ claim that he is the bread of life. I ponder this question of Jesus frequently: Will you also go away? I ultimately hope that my answer is consistent with Peter’s response, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life, and we have believed, and have come to know that you are the Holy One of God” (John 6:67-69).

 

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Why the Eucharist is Most Wonderful Gift to Receive

By: William Hemsworth

On June 23 we celebrated Corpus Christi Sunday, and what a great day it was.  Though we celebrate the liturgy of the Eucharist everyday at Mass, there is a tendency to get complacent.  This seems to be our human nature, because if we do something enough we tend to go through the motions.

Eucharist

On this day the church asks us to take a step back and take a moment to remember what an awesome gift the Eucharist is.  In honor of this, I also want to take a step back to look at what scripture and the early church tells us about the blessed sacrament.

Though some terms for the Eucharist developed over time, the belief of what the Eucharist is has been around since New Testament times.  Jesus gave a speech that we call the Bread of Life Discourse in which he says that unless we eat his flesh and drink his blood that we have no life within us (John 6:53).  The synoptic Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke give us the words of institution that we hear so often (Matthew 26:17-30, Mark 14:12-26, and Luke 22:7-39).

In Summary of these Jesus tells us to eat the bread and says “This is my body”.  Then he took the cup of wine and “This is the cup of my blood that was given for you”.  Notice how our Lord says “this is” and not that it is merely a symbolic action?

Catholic Eucharist meme

The real presence of Christ in the Eucharist is one that held true in the doctrine of the early church.  The big heresy going around in the first couple centuries of the church was Gnosticism.  The Gnostics believes that all matter was evil, and as such Jesus himself didn’t actually die on the cross.  Since all matter was deemed evil by the Gnostics, the Eucharist was something that was unfathomable?  After all, if matter were evil, then there was no way that the bread and wine can transform into the body and blood of Christ.

Heresy gif

The early church fathers understood the gnostic line of thinking and used the Eucharist as a way to refute them.  In approximately 107 A.D. St. Ignatius of Antioch writes in his letter to the Smyrneans, “They [the Gnostics] abstain from the Eucharist and from prayer, because they confess not the Eucharist to be the flesh of our Saviour Jesus Christ, which suffered for our sins, and which the Father, of His goodness, raised up again”.

Justin Martyr, writing around 150 A.D., states that the bread and wine changes to the body and blood of Christ upon the prayer of the priest.  In his great work titled Against Heresies, St. Irenaeus writes “the bread, which is produced from the earth, when it receives the invocation of God, is no longer common bread, but the Eucharist.”

There are many other such quotes like this span for several centuries.  One such quote comes from St. John Chrystostom who died in 407 A.D.  Describing the Eucharist the great saint states, “How many of you say: I should like to see His face, His garments, His shoes. You do see Him, you touch Him, you eat Him. He gives Himself to you, not only that you may see Him, but also to be your food and nourishment.”

Eucharist

These quotes go on and on, and through them we see that the teaching of the church from the beginning is that the Eucharist is the body and blood of Christ.  At this point you are probably wondering why I am quoting all these great saints.  Friends, my heart hurts.  For every one person that enters the Catholic church, there are six people who leave.  Why would they leave such a great gift such as the Eucharist?  When I ask those that leave, their answers range from the sexual abuse scandal to a disagreement with a priest.  However, a majority that I have spoken to leave because they do not believe what the church teaches about the Eucharist.  Some didn’t even know the church’s teaching.

Perhaps we have taken this great sacrament for granted and our actions no longer show the reverence it deserves.  Perhaps some have just been poorly catechized. Maybe it is both.  I urge you my friends to take a moment to reflect on the greatness that is the Eucharist.  The very gift of himself that our Lord gives us to nourish and strengthen us.  May we never take it for granted and show it the reverence it deserves.


About our guest blogger:

William is a convert to the Catholic faith.  Before entering the church he was ordained as a Baptist and Lutheran and earned a Master of Divinity from Liberty Theological Seminary.  William lives with his wife and four children in Tucson, AZ and teaches religious education for children and adults.  Check out his website/blog at williamhemsworth.com for more great and informative Catholic content!

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